The insecticidal and nematocidal uses of hemp

Cannabis as repellent and pesticide

McPartland, John M. 1997. Cannabis as repellent and pesticide. Journal of the International Hemp Association 4(2): 87-92

Cannabis has been used as a pest repellent and pesticide in a variety of formulations. It has been planted as a companion crop to deter insects, nematodes, fungi, and weedy plants. Dried leaves and flowers have repelled or killed insects, mites, nematodes, and weeds. Plant extracts (either aqueous or polar or ganic solvent extracts) have killed or repelled insects, mites, nematodes, fungi, weedy plants, bacteria, and protozoans. Pure cannabinoids reportedly inhibit or kill bacteria, fungi, and insect

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Nematicidal activities of Cannabis sativa L. and Zanthoxylum alatum Roxb. against Meloidogyne incognita

Tariq Mukhtar - Department of Plant Pathology, Pir Mehr Ali Shah Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi, Pakistan
Muhammad Zameer Kayani - Green Belt Project, Department of Agriculture, Rawalpindi, Pakistan
Muhammad Arshad Hussain - Plant Pathology Section, Regional Agricultural Research Institute, Bahawalpur, Pakistan

Because of being costly and pernicious to the environment and human health, the use of nematicides has become prohibitive in many countries and the management of plant parasitic nematodes using antagonistic plants can be a very attractive alternative. In the present studies the effectiveness of aqueous extracts of Cannabis sativa and Zanthoxylum alatum was assessed on hatching, mortality and infectivity of Meloidogyne incognita at different concentrations viz. S, S:1, S:5, S:10, S:25, S:50 and S:100. Both the plants had significant effects on juvenile mortality and hatching inhibition in a dose-dependent manner. Mortality and hatching inhibition caused by C. sativa were significantly higher than that of Z. alatum. Time duration also affected mortality and hatching inhibition significantly

Carbon storage potential in natural fiber composites

Muhammad Pervaiz, Mohini M. Sain * Faculty of Forestry, Advanced Wood Composite Group, Earth Science Center, University of Toronto, 33 Willcocks Street, Toronto, Ont., Canada M5S 3B3

The environmental performance of hemp based natural fiber mat thermoplastic (NMT) has been evaluated in this study by quantifying carbon storage potential and CO2 emissions and comparing the results with commercially available glass fiber composites. Non-wovenmats of hemp fiber and polypropylene matrix were used to make NMT samples by film-stacking method without using any binder aid. The results showed that hemp based NMT have compatible or even better strength properties as compared to conventional flax based thermoplastics

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